Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung

The Latest:

Tough Questions: Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi visiting Czech Republic and Hungary

Myanmar’s State Councillor Aung San Suu Kyi is visiting the Czech Republic and Hungary – her first visit to Europe since the mass expulsion of the Rohingya. This could be a first step to reopen dialogue between Myanmar and the West – but tough questions need to be posed about her handling of the Rohingya question and other human rights concerns.

By Axel Harneit-Sievers

The Green Political Foundation

The Heinrich Böll Foundation is part of the Green political movement that has developed worldwide as a response to the traditional politics of socialism, liberalism, and conservatism. Our main tenets are ecology and sustainability, democracy and human rights, self-determination and justice. We are a Green Think Tank and an International Policy Network.  


The Prague office of the Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung is a regional office, responsible for activities in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary.



Latest Publications

Political integration of Hungarian students, 2019

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After a four-year absence, the Active Youth (Aktív Fiatalok) Research Group has returned with a new survey about the political attitudes of higher education students in Hungary. The significance of this year’s findings relies on the fact that the political views of the majority of students sampled in this most recent survey – including some born as recently as 2000 – were formed during consecutive terms of prime minister Viktor Orbán and his government, considered by many political scientists and commentators to be a hybrid regime.

Phantom Menace. The Politics and Policies of Migration in Central Europe

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Despite the presence of migration in the discourse of politicians, media and the general public in recent years, there is a persistent lack of facts about the life situations and motivations of newcomers to Europe. With this book the the Heinrich Böll Foundation and the Institute for Public Affairs aim to contribute to a fact-based debate on the politics and policies of migration in Central Europe. 

Democracy

The situation in Hungary is unchanged

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Political Capital’s analysis of the relationship between the European People’s Party (EPP) and Fidesz, Fidesz’s suspension, and its consequences in Hungary.

By Attila Juhász

Energy & Climate

The nuclear legacy nobody wants

Czech nuclear reactors have so far produced at least 4000 tons of highly radioactive waste. If the number of reactors grows, so will the amount of waste produced. The government has long declared itself in favor of developing nuclear energy even as it still does not know how to solve the nuclear waste problem. Martin Sedlák takes a look.

By Martin Sedlák

When it comes to nature, Hungary’s conservatives won’t conserve

Environmental policy and the sustainable energy transition have never been top priorities of Hungary’s right-wing populist government, and 2018 was no different in this respect. That said, the progress made in different areas of policy varies, and some sectors performed better than others. What follows is not a detailed sectoral analysis, but rather an overview of last year’s important developments and trends.

By Tamás Ibolya

Foreign Affairs and Security

Ticking off the Czech Republic’s UN Commitment as Completed: Reflecting on the First Czech National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security

In January 2017, the Czech Republic introduced its first National Action Plan on UNSCR 1325 on women, peace and security (NAP 1325), adopting it as the 64th country in the world, as the 18th EU Member State and as the first country in Central Europe to do so. Notwithstanding its status as a country unaffected by direct conflict, the Czech Republic is obliged to pursue a gender, peace and security (GPS) agenda through its foreign policy, just as other EU member state signatories to UNSCR 1325 are expected to do so.

By Blanka Šimůnková, Míla O'Sullivan

Nord Stream II: Shaking hands with the devil

The gas pipeline Nord Stream II should double the existing natural gas transport capacity from Russia to Germany via the Baltic Sea. Juraj Mesík explains why the Kremlin will be the biggest winner of this project.

By Dr. Juraj Mesík